Climate change – who can keep up?

Evolution has no forethought. An artic fox turns white at a particular time in winter due to the selection pressures experienced by its ancestors. This adaptation helped foxes in the past blend into the snowy background and more easily disguise themselves from prey. But what if timing of first snowfall starts to move later and later into the year or becomes more unpredictable? This is a question of phenology, the … Continue reading

Parasitism Threatens Mutualism

Background: The world is a complicated place. Organisms typically interact with one another simultaneously and the strength of interactions can depend on what’s happening in the environment. As a number of organisms within a community increases, indirect interactions also increase exponentially (Abrahams 1992). As ecologists, we’re fascinated by the beauty of this complex world while we struggle to understand and predict how nature really works. Studying a pair-wise interaction is … Continue reading

Changing world, changing interactions

When I think of how a species might be affected by global change, I tend to focus first on the abiotic: distribution maps predicting species range shifts based on temperature and precipitation come to mind. But obviously it’s more complicated than that—global change is bound to affect biotic factors as well, particularly interactions between species. This makes predicting the consequences of global change more complicated. If species A interacts with … Continue reading

Consider the Ocean

A recent paper in Ecological Applications put a classic theory to the test, with a twist. The theory of island biogeography was one of the first conceptual frameworks to provide guidance for the conservation of biodiversity on a landscape scale. It’s pretty intuitive stuff. Changes in species diversity on ecological time scales (i.e., over decades) in any habitat are the result of colonizing species minus species extinctions. MacArthur and Wilson … Continue reading